ChessProblem 7

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Sometimes in chess, good moves are difficult to see but when you realise that the move is there, everything becomes obvious. In this game, the very experienced Scottish player, Alan Grant (as White) was up against GM Aleksander Wohl. The game was played at the Hastings Chess Congress at the start of 2011 in Round 8. The game seemed on the face of it fairly equal until Black uncorked a move that instantly won the game. What was Black’s move?

Last weeks Problem


Black to move and win. Black is in big trouble being substantially down in material and his Queen under attack from the White Knight. But Black has a move that wins. What is it?

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Chess Problem 6

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Black to move and win. Black is in big trouble being substantially down in material and his Queen under attack from the White Knight. But Black has a move that wins. What is it?

Last weeks Problem


Black to move and win. It is always a good in chess to have a mindset based on a ‘never give up’ philosophy. In this position Black is in dire straits being substantially down in material. But Black has a move that wins. What is it?

Click here for last weeks Answer

Chess Problem 5

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Black to move and win. It is always good in chess to have a mindset based on a ‘never give up’ philosophy. In this position Black is in dire straits being substantially down in material. But Black has a move that wins. What is it?

Last weeks Problem


White to move and mate next move. I first saw this problem years ago in a pocket book, ‘Test Your Chess’ published in the United States in 1978 by Gerald Abrahams. It is a tricky little problem but deceptively simple.

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Chess Problem 4

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White to move and mate next move. I first saw this problem years ago in a pocket book, ‘Test Your Chess’ published in the United States in 1978 by Gerald Abrahams. It is a tricky little problem but deceptively simple.

Last weeks Problem


Find the winning moves where White checkmates in 2 moves.

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Chess Problem 3

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Today’s chess problem comes from another of the world’s most famous players, Paul Morphy, (1837-1884). The position selected is from a match played in Paris during 1858. Morphy was White against the Duke of Braunschweig and Count Isouard. They reached the following position where Morph played 1. Bd7+. If Black recaptures with the Queen (1…Qd7) we see several checks along the lines of 2. Qb8+ Ke7 3. Qe5+ Kd8  4. Bf6+ and Black is losing most of his pieces (explore these variations for yourself).


But what happens after 1. Bd7+ Nd7? Find the winning moves where White checkmates in 2 moves.

Last weeks problem


Black to play and win
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Chess Problem 2

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‘Today’s problem comes from a famous match played by one of the greatest players of all time, Cuban Grandmaster Jose Capablanca. Here we join him in Moscow in 1914 and we see an example of his wonderfully elegant play. His opponent (White) is Ossip Bernstein, himself one of the top players of his era. In this position, Capablanca (Black) makes a move after which White resigns instantly. What is Black’s move? Black to move

Last weeks Problem

White to play and win
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Chess problem no1

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The mastery of chess tactics is an essential element of good chess play. The problem below is the first of a weekly series that we will post at this website for the foreseeable future. For each problem, the solution will be posted one week after the problem is displayed. Enjoy!

White to play and win

For this first problem we have to thank Dr John Nunn, one of England’s strongest Grandmasters. The problem we set is to find a move that wins the game by force.